Go Hazelnut Spotting

Green hazel nuts

Green hazel nuts

Mid July is the right time to go out and start finding the hazelnut carrying trees in preparation for their September fall.

The reason you have to be well ahead of the game on this foraging delicacy, is because you are in a race against the most prolific bandit of hazelnuts. The Grey Squirrel.

Stand of Hazel Trees

Stand of Hazel Trees

Look for Hazel stands and peer into the foliage. You are looking for the unripe green nut casings, unfortunately so is the grey squirrel as it prefers to strip the tree before the nuts ripen.

In mesolithic times, British inhabitants relied heavily on the carbohydrate from the Hazelnut. There has been archeological evidence found in the cracked nut casings around settlements that suggest they stored it as a staple to last the dark winter months. However when the grey squirrel landed ashore, their unripe pillaging of the nut has had a double blow to the Hazel ecology, as the unripe nut cannot seed. So the modern forager has a problem…

If you want to help with the Hazel ecology, the Prince of Wales in on your side. He has said that it is fine to “control” the invasive grey. We will be adding a feature on the legality of hunting grey squirrels shortly. In the meantime you can read more in this article from the Telegraph.

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Category: Activities,Foraging,Summer


Green hazel nuts

Green hazel nuts

Mid July is the right time to go out and start finding the hazelnut carrying trees in preparation for their September fall.

The reason you have to be well ahead of the game on this foraging delicacy, is because you are in a race against the most prolific bandit of hazelnuts. The Grey Squirrel.

Stand of Hazel Trees

Stand of Hazel Trees

Look for Hazel stands and peer into the foliage. You are looking for the unripe green nut casings, unfortunately so is the grey squirrel as it prefers to strip the tree before the nuts ripen.

In mesolithic times, British inhabitants relied heavily on the carbohydrate from the Hazelnut. There has been archeological evidence found in the cracked nut casings around settlements that suggest they stored it as a staple to last the dark winter months. However when the grey squirrel landed ashore, their unripe pillaging of the nut has had a double blow to the Hazel ecology, as the unripe nut cannot seed. So the modern forager has a problem…

If you want to help with the Hazel ecology, the Prince of Wales in on your side. He has said that it is fine to “control” the invasive grey. We will be adding a feature on the legality of hunting grey squirrels shortly. In the meantime you can read more in this article from the Telegraph.

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July 16, 2015 | Activities, Foraging, Summer | No comment